Creamy Jerusalem Artichoke Soup

P2048549We got a sniff of spring today in Boston and normally this day is full of joy and hope for these frigid days to be over, but I panicked.  I felt an urge to blog all of our winter-appropriate recipes before the flowers start blooming and readers dismiss our one-season-behind ideas.  I guess that’s one down-fall to having seasonal cooking — no one wants chicken soup in the middle of the scorching summer.  So today we share with you Creamy Jerusalem Artichoke Soup, which you might recognize as Sunchoke soup.  We made this soup with Yvette Van Boven back in October and results were delicious.  The best part is that you don’t need heavy cream involved, so it stays relatively healthy; the key is to use the blender for a period of time.  We also like the idea of cooking with an undercover ingredient because  it adds another element of surprise.  Good taste and secret ingredient equals happy and curious eater who wants the recipe and feels motivated to cook from scratch and eliminate processed food.  I wish I could write that out as an expression using variables and exponents for you.  Hope you get to do some last-minute winter cooking — or not, and embrace the new change.
P20485532 Tbs olive oil
2 shallots chopped
1 tsp coriander
1 tsp rosemary
1 lb Jerusalem artichoke, peeled and diced
2 celery branches diced
1 medium size potato diced
1 Tbs tomato paste
3 cups vegetable broth
Garnish: Paprika, parsley, and olive oil

1.  Heat the oil in large heavy bottom pan and add shallots, coriander, and rosemary.  Cook until shallots gets slightly brown.
2.  Add vegetables and tomato paste and stir.
3.  Add broth and let it simmer for about 20 minutes, or until the artichokes are tender.
4.  Use a blender.  The longer you blend the creamier the soup will become.
5.  Garnish with the options given above, or any others such as scallops, blue potato chips, oyster crackers, etc.

 

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Valentine’s Beet and Cauliflower Soup

P2138656 copyWe made it!  This month marks our 1 year of blogging and we just want to say many thanks for sticking with us.  Starting a blog is easy peasy but continuously writing  posts — not so much.  It really does require a lot thought, time, and creativity, but the process has been nothing but fun, and slowly but surely we will continue to grow this little space of ours.  So today — when some of us expect roses and an expensive dinner — we propose that you have a relaxing night with your partner, pets, or yourself, and cook.  This Beet Cauliflower soup is great for that.  Why?  Well, look at that color!  No frosting could beet (pun intended) that deep-earthy red.  The rich color will surprise you.  Just make sure you don’t spill the soup because it will look like a crime scene.  Also, don’t take left-overs to lunch and open it in a small-enclosed office…cauliflower stinks when chilled.  The soup is also extremely healthy and you will experience the flavors in three stages: first the tangy cauliflower, then potato cream, ending with a light after taste of the beets.  It is so lovely it will definitely make someone’s heart beet….  Enjoy and Happy Vday!
P2138646 P2138628Adapted from Martha Stewart Living
Yields: 4

2 Tbs olive oil
1 medium yellow onion
3 cups chopped cauliflower
2 medium-small red beets
Dash of salt
3 cups vegetable broth
2 Tbs coarsely chopped fresh dill, plus sprigs for garnish

1.  Heat oil in a medium pot over medium-high heat.  Add onion and saute until translucent — about 4 minutes.
2.  Add cauliflower, beets, and salt.
3.  Add broth, and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat, and simmer until beets and cauliflower are tender — about 20 minutes.
4.  Remove from heat and add dill.  Let the soup cool for 10 minutes and puree until smooth.  Add water if it’s too thick.
5.  Return soup to pot and bring to a simmer.  Season with more salt if you think there is not enough flavor.
6.  Sprinkle dill sprigs right before serving.

Flash from the back, and recipes if you need last minute ideas:

meringues


PB210135

Asparagus Avocado Hearty Soup

P1138499P1138481I have to admit cooking sometimes stresses me out for two reasons 1)  The preparation.  I could never be one of those people who plan every meal of the month and buy everything in bulk.  If I could really have it my way I would walk to the marché every evening and cook with all fresh ingredients.  But this is Boston.  2)  My meal has to be served at it’s appropriate temperature.  It’s this strange paranoia I’ve always had and therefore prefer baking.  Feeling the clock ticking while people wait to be served a warm dish makes me sweat and my face turns so serious, which I know is bad and only adds pre-mature wrinkles to my very dry skin (thank you winter).  However, this Asaparagus soup only makes you younger.  It’s made with lots of greens and is a hearty soup that can be served in clear bowls which will brighten up a dull table.  It can be served chilled or warm and during the spring or even the winter.  It’s easy and delicious so no sweat! or wrinkles.

Adapted from Aran Goyoaga
Yields:  4-6 servings

2 Tbs olive oil
1 shallot, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 lb green asparagus, touch bottoms trimmed and diced
1 tsp salt
3 cups vegetable stock
2 cups tightly packed arugula
1 avocado, pitted and peeled
Garnish (optional): Bacon, Croutons, almonds, microgreens, shrimp, crabmeat, etc.

1.  Heat the olive oil in a large pot over medium heat and add shallots, garlic, asparagus, and salt.  Cook the vegetables for 3 minutes or until tender but not browned.
2.  Add vegetable stock and bring to a boil.  Then, turn the heat to low and simmer for 4 minutes or until the asparagus is tender.
3.  Add arugula and cook for 1 additional minute.  Remove the pot from the heat.
4.  Add avocado and puree the soup.  Add seasoning (salt, pepper) if needed.
5.  Serve the soup warm or chilled and top with your favorite ingredient.

Soup Soup Soup Soup with Yvette van Boven!

Soup Soup Soup Soup with Yvette van Boven!

This weekend was such a treat and it wasn’t because I stuffed my face with cookies. I took a cooking class with the one and only Yvette Van Boven. ? If that’s your reaction then: a) You’re American (most likely) … Continue reading